REPORT: Binghamton Professor Who Picked Students Based On Race Resigns

A Professor at SUNY Binghamton in New York has resigned from her position after coming under fire for engaging in discriminatory practices in her classroom.

As Campus Reform reported in February of this year, Ms. Candela prioritized student ideas and interactions based on the participants' race and gender.

A Professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York (SUNY Binghamton), has resigned from her position after coming under fire for engaging in discriminatory practices in her classroom. 

Pipe DreamSUNY Binghamton’s student newspaper, reported on Oct. 3 that “Candela quietly resigned from her post on Sept. 1, stating she found it difficult to remain at the University.” 

[RELATED: These professors support the 'progressive stacking' policy that prioritizes students' comments based on race] 

As Campus Reform reported in February of this year, Ms. Candela included a "progressive stacking" policy in her classes, a term used to describe the prioritizing of student ideas and interactions based on the participants' race and gender. 

If, for example, both a White and a Black student raised their hands to answer a question, according to this policy the Black student must always be prioritized to speak before the White student. 

syllabus obtained by Campus Reform for her class ‘Sociology 100: Social Change: Introduction to Sociology course’ reads, “[W]e try to give priority to non-white folks, to women, and to shy and quiet people who rarely raise their hands.”

[RELATED: Elon University cancels segregated 'White caucus' amid backlash]

“It also means that if you are white, male, or someone privileged by the racial and gender structures of our society to have your voice easily voiced and heard, we will often ask you to hold off on your questions or comments to give others priority and will come back to you a bit later or at another time," it continues.

Candela, previously assistant professor of sociology at SUNY Binghamton, focuses her research on “Chinese migrations and the global dimensions of Chinese history and China’s social transformation,” according to her Academia profile

Campus Reform reached out to SUNY Binghamton for comment, and made best efforts to contact Ms. Candela. This article will be updated accordingly.