EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: Jane Fonda-led climate activists protest big banks...but won't close their accounts

  • Students and activists have been marching in downtown Washington D.C. every Friday for climate change.
  • Campus Reform visited one of the latest protests where students marched against banks, despite admitting to owning bank accounts.

Students and leftist activists have marched in downtown Washington D.C. multiple times now to protest climate change. 

Campus Reform’s Eduardo Neret went to a recent march where protesters, led by Jane Fonda, shut down traffic near the World Bank and Black Rock, an investment management company, for investing in the fossil fuel industry. Protesters claimed bank investment in fossil fuels helped contribute to climate change. 

“I don’t think anyone should be profiting off the f**king destruction of our planet"   

WATCH: 

“I think it’s wrong for anyone to profit off of the exploitation and destruction of another person’s life, or an animal’s life, or of another living being’s life,” one student told Neret. 

“I don’t think anyone should be profiting off the f***ing destruction of our planet,” another student concurred. “The idea of profiting off of fossil fuels and of profiting off the exploitation of our earth is intrinsically intertwined with capitalism.” 

[RELATED: Students NATIONWIDE ditch class for 'Climate Strike']

Neret asked the students protesting the banks and financial institutions if they themselves owned bank accounts. Most students admitted to having bank accounts and admitted to being complicit in contributing to climate change. 

“Isn’t it hypocritical for you to have a bank account at one of these banks that you’re protesting,” Neret asked. 

“There is no way to live currently that does not make you complicit in the climate crisis,” one student argued.

Other students denied any responsibility and blamed the “capitalist system.” 

“On a personal level, since we are all subjects in the capitalist system, it’s extremely difficult for an individual...to completely avoid the system,” a student claimed. 

Neret also asked Fonda if having bank accounts indirectly contributed to climate change, and if Americans should close their bank accounts for the climate. He also asked her if it is hypocritical to have bank accounts while protesting outside of banks, but received no response and was quickly rushed away by event organizers. 

Neret then asked protesters if “by shutting down traffic” and making “people sit in their cars, which burns more gas, which emits more carbon,” if they were contributing to the destruction of the climate, which they claimed to be fighting. 

“[That argument] is f***ing bulls***t,” one student said. 

[RELATED: VIDEO: Students all about Ocasio-Cortez's 'Green New Deal'...then find out what's in it]

“That argument is actually really nitpicky,” another agreed. 

The march was organized by a number of groups, including Shutdown DC, the Sunrise Movement, and Extinction Rebellion

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @eduneret



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Eduardo Neret
Eduardo Neret | Digital Reporter

Eduardo Neret is a digital reporter for Campus Reform. Prior to taking on his current position, Eduardo served as the Senior Florida Correspondent for Campus Reform and founded a conservative web publication where he hosted a series of interviews with notable conservative commentators and public figures. Eduardo’s work has appeared on the Fox News Channel, FoxNews.com, The Washington Examiner, Daily Caller, The Drudge Report, The Blaze, and The Daily Wire. He most recently served as a contributor to the Red Alert Politics section of The Washington Examiner. In addition to his independent journalism, Neret also previously worked at the Department of Justice and the Fox News Channel. He has appeared on numerous radio programs and NewsMaxTV to discuss his work and comment on relevant political issues.

20 Articles by Eduardo Neret