Campus Reform | VIDEO: Students on why they oppose loan debt forgiveness pushed by Dems in coronavirus aid package

VIDEO: Students on why they oppose loan debt forgiveness pushed by Dems in coronavirus aid package

Campus Reform talked to students who oppose the measure.

Democrats in Congress have proposed including student loan debt forgiveness in the latest coronavirus stimulus.

After Democrats in Congress recently moved to include student loan debt forgiveness in the coronavirus aid package, Campus Reform asked students who paid off their debt,  who worked to obtain scholarships, or who are working through school to explain why they oppose the measure. 

“I think it’s completely unfair,” Florida Campus Correspondent Hannah Lalgie said. “Canceling student debt would require one mass intervention from the government, which we all know isn’t a good idea.”

“I’m a student that took on debt early on in my college career,” New York Campus Correspondent Justin Begley said. “But then I worked by having a job through college.”

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Other students talked about working to pay for school as well.

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“Ever since I’ve been 16 years old, I’ve been working to be able to afford college,” Florida Campus Correspondent Genesis Sanchez added.

“I started working two part-time jobs,” Texas Campus Correspondent McKenna Dallmeyer said. 

Dallmeyer also has no student loan debt, and combined work income with scholarship money to pay for college. 

"[Eliminating student loan debt] is really a slap in the face to all of us who have worked so hard in order to avoid such a burden,” Dallmeyer added.  

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In addition, the students talked about the choice to attend more affordable community colleges and in-state universities as opposed to private schools. 

“I decided to go to the community college route first because I knew it would be the cheapest option for me in the long run,” Sanchez said.

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