Campus Reform | 'Institutional pride': Amy Coney Barrett’s alma mater responds to SCOTUS consideration

'Institutional pride': Amy Coney Barrett’s alma mater responds to SCOTUS consideration

Rhodes College, where Barrett received her undergraduate degree, announced it has received a number of letters regarding the president's reported consideration of her for the Supreme Court.

The college responded in a letter to the community by calling ties to Barrett "a source of institutional pride."

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The alma mater of Amy Coney Barrett, one of President Donald Trump’s potential Supreme Court justice picks, is weighing in on her being considered to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat.

Rhodes College, where Barrett attended as an undergraduate student, said it has received many letters from students and alumni since it was first reported that Coney Barrett was under consideration. The school said letters contain a wide diversity of reactions. In response, Rhodes College President Marjorie Hass wrote a letter to the campus, describing ties to the Supreme Court as "a source of institutional pride."

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Barrett received her Bachelor’s degree in English from Rhodes in 1994.  She was also a member of the honor’s society Phi Beta Kappa and elected to the Honor Council and Student Hall of Fame, according to Hass. Then, she went on to attend law school at the University of Notre Dame and later held two high-profile conservative clerkships, one with Judge Laurence Silberman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and another with the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

"It is remarkable that a Rhodes graduate should appear at the top of a list of potential Supreme Court nominees, but it is in keeping with a long history of Rhodes connections to the highest court in the land," wrote Hass.

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Barrett, if chosen, would be the second alumnus of Rhode College to be a Supreme Court Justice. 

Abe Fortas was the first from 1965-1969.

"Judge Coney Barrett participates in this tradition of academic excellence,” wrote Hass. “She has gone on to a career of professional distinction and achievement.”

President Donald Trump reportedly met with Barrett on Monday. Trump is set to announce his nominee to replace Ginsburg on Saturday. 

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @JezzamineWolk