Campus Reform | Humboldt State hosts 'Whiteness Accountability Space' so 'White folks' can address their 'anti-Blackness'

Humboldt State hosts 'Whiteness Accountability Space' so 'White folks' can address their 'anti-Blackness'

Humboldt State University announced that it will host a "Whiteness Accountability Space."

According to the university's description, the space is intended for "White folks" to address their "anti-Blackness."

A public university in Arcata, California, will kick off a series of White-identity-based discussions on Thursday, according to an announcement on its website.

Humboldt State University will host a virtual event, titled "Whiteness Accountability Space" during which White students, faculty, and staff, are encouraged to "critically reflect, process, and ask questions with the intention of mitigating harm caused to Black, Indigenous, and People of Color." 

The university says the discussions will help White people "participate in conversations and spaces that are diverse."

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"Everyone is welcome to these sessions intended to provide a space for White folks to process feelings around anti-blackness, police brutality, and systemic racism in order to move toward anti-racist," the university said, promising that "these sessions will push back on the White tendency to intellectualize and encourage folks to stay connected to the feeling realm." 

And, the university said, "These sessions will be facilitated by White facilitators." 

Campus Reform has reported on similar White-identity-based and likely segregated events across higher education before. On February 10, the University of Alabama-Birmingham held "White People Talking About Racism," where White people discussed racism "amongst themselves." On February 9, Elon University in North Carolina cancelled a Whites-only caucus it planned to launch during Black History Month. 

Humboldt State University did not respond to a request for comment in time for publication. 

Follow the author of this article: Dion J. Pierre