Campus Reform | University of Montana student government unanimously passes bill to require ‘anti-bias’ training among leadership

University of Montana student government unanimously passes bill to require ‘anti-bias’ training among leadership

The University of Montana student government unanimously approved legislation to mandate “anti-bias” training for all student senators and executives.

The measure serves to “build authentic and lasting solidarity among BIPOC, dismantle white supremacy, and advance racial justice.”

The University of Montana’s student government - the Associated Students of the University of Montana - unanimously approved a measure to require “anti-bias” training for all student senators and executives.

The bill’s passage follows the resignation of a non-white student senator who, according to student newspaper The Montana Kaimin, alleged that she had been called a racial slur by another member of the Associated Students of the University of Montana.

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The senator’s resignation letter reportedly included nine recommendations for the student to “cultivate a safe community for BIPOCs.” The student senate passed one recommendation — the “Resolution Amending ASUM Bylaws to Require Anti-Bias Training for ASUM Executives and Senators” — unanimously.

The legislation claims that “ASUM has not made meaningful or measurable progress with respect to anti-bias in the governance of the student body” while other universities “have either implemented or plan to implement anti-bias modules in curriculum and personnel policy.”

According to the student government website, the measure passed unanimously during the March 10 ASUM Senate meeting.

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Accordingly, the legislation will “implement Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion training mandatory for freshman students to complete at orientation” across the university, as well as “require anti-bias trainings for all senators and executives” in an effort to “build authentic and lasting solidarity among BIPOC, dismantle white supremacy, and advance racial justice.”

Campus Reform reached out to ASUM and the University of Montana; this article will be updated with any comment.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @BenZeisloft