'Latinx’ student organizations tell university to implement 'ALL these demands' to fight 'microaggressions'

A coalition of Latinx organizations at Duke University has set forth demands to combat 'microaggressions' and discomfort on campus.

The demands include creating a fully funded ‘Latinx’ cultural center.

A coalition of Latinx organizations at Duke University has set forth demands to combat “microaggressions” and discomfort on campus.

These demands include establishing a Latinx cultural center on campus, payment for Latino Student Recruitment Weekend (LRSW) co-chairs, increased representation among staff and faculty, a Latinx studies department that includes a major and minor, and increased admissions office recruitment in highly Latinx parts of cities, the Duke Chronicle reports. 

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The full list of demands additionally includes “permanent, public space historicizing our integration, history and ongoing achievements on this campus in the form of a Latinx cultural center.” 

The organizations are: Mi Gente; Latin American Student Organization; Brazilian Student Association; La Unidad Latina, Lambda Upsilon Lambda, Rho Chapter; Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Zeta Mu Chapter; Latinx Business Organization; Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers; Latinx/a Women’s Alliance; Define America.

“We demand Duke establish a plan to follow ALL these demands to fruition in a transparent, ethical, and effective way that will prioritize student, faculty and staff input,” the partnered organizations state. 

On Feb. 9, the student organizations held a "teach-in" with over 120 students, professors, and alumni in attendance to discuss the coalition's platform. 

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At the event, the founder of Latinx Business Organization, Carlo-Alfonso Garza, addressed the audience, stating “This isn’t the first round of Latinx demands." 

“The first one was in 1994. We will not be going away. President Price will engage with us. Change can happen," Garza explained.

Campus Reform reached out to Duke University and the student organizations mentioned for comment; this article will be updated accordingly.