WATCH: Students come out against cancel culture: statues edition

Campus Reform Correspondent Haika Mrema asked students at Baylor University their thoughts on the national trend of protesting to remove prominent statues.

'In America, people can get offended over the smallest things. It's just a statue,' one student explained.


Campus Reform Correspondent, Haika Mrema, asked students at Baylor University in Texas their thoughts on the national trend in recent years of protesting to remove prominent statues. 

Students reacted to the protest that called to remove the Judge Baylor statue, which honors him as campus co-founder and namesake of the university.

While a few agree with the protests, the general consensus among those asked was to preserve the statue to acknowledge the history and learn from past mistakes.

[RELATED: Baylor University chooses to keep its name AND commemorate first African American graduates]

“I think it’s more of a reminder of where we came from, and how much progress we’ve made since that time,” one student answered. 

“If we don’t know our history, how are we supposed to learn from it,” another student asked.

Using a quote from a supporter of the Judge Baylor protest, Mrema asked the students if statues should continue to be removed based on whether it makes students feel uncomfortable or not.

“If we just start taking away things that make other people uncomfortable, what’s going to be left,” one student asked rhetorically. 

“In America, people can get offended over the smallest things. It's just a statue,” one student explained.

Some who agreed with the protests believed that there are better ways to learn about the history of the statue without having it displayed. 

“I don't think we're in danger of [forgetting the past] with the internet,” one student answered.

Watch the full video here.