Kamala Harris convenes academics to prepare for post-Roe America

Five American university law professors recently sat for a roundtable discussion with Vice President Kamala Harris to discuss the potential impact of the anticipated overturn of Roe v. Wade.

The mid-June meeting came as the nation waits for the Supreme Court decision that could repeal federal abortion protection.

Five American university law professors recently sat for a roundtable discussion with Vice President Kamala Harris to discuss the potential impact of the anticipated overturn of Roe v. Wade.

Harris sought advice from the academics about steps the administration could take in a post-Roe America, vocalizing her concerns that the overturn could have other implications for the progressive agenda.

New York University was represented by professors Peggy Cooper Davis and Melissa Murray. Harvard Law School was represented by professor Glenn Cohen. 

"The roundtable was a wonderful discussion, and I was happy to participate," Davis told Campus Reform. "The Vice President is deeply concerned about many possible consequences of the overturning of Roe v. Wade." 

[RELATED: Public university creates abortion task force in wake of potential end to Roe v. Wade]

University of California- Irvine professor Michele Bratcher Goodwin and University of Michigan Law School professor Leah Litman were also present for the conversation.

Brennan Center for Justice leaders and writer Jennifer Weiss-Wolf were also in attendance.

"I’ve asked these — these experts to be here to talk with me about how we might best prepare the American people for the consequences of what this decision will be — in terms of their life and the choices that they are able to make and have a right to make — so that, at the very least, folks can be prepared," Harris said.

The meeting preceded the third week of opinions released by the Supreme Court of the United States this month. 

Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, which has the potential to overturn Roe v. Wade, was not one of the six Supreme Court rulings issued on Wednesday.

Eighteen cases remain before the court begins its recess expected late June or early July.

The nation was put on standby early May when a leaked majority opinion draft announced the court allegedly voted in favor of Dobbs. The ruling would overturn nearly 50 years of precedent that solidified federal protection for abortion.

Thirteen states have already "trigger laws" that would take effect in the event of Roe being overturned. 

The Guttmacher Institute predicts that 26 more states could outlaw abortion if Roe was overturned. 

[RELATED: From Rhode Island to Utah, these state lawmakers are introducing legislation to keep men out of women's sports]

Last week, a pro-abortion activist attempted to kill Kavanaugh and was apprehended by police. 

Campus Reform also reported how destructive tactics by pro-abortion activists have property damage in college campus communities, including near Portland State University and Colorado State University.

Recently, an alumni reunion at Yale University twisted into a protest against former classmate Brett Kavanaugh. The protest against Kavanaugh preceded a stretch of unlawful protests outside of justice's homes and in affiliated neighborhoods.

Campus Reform contacted every individual and the White House for comment. This article will be updated accordingly.

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