DOED delays Title IX changes again as conservative lawmakers protect women's sports

The Department of Education will release its proposed Title IX changes in June, a department spokesperson told Campus Reform.

As Campus Reform reported last month, Republican lawmakers argue this update would undermine the rights of women.

The Department of Education (DOED) will release its proposed Title IX changes in June, a department spokesperson told Campus Reform.

As Campus Reform originally reported, the Department of Education is considering expanding Title IX protections to include gender identity. However, the official announcement was expected to be delivered by the end of April.

Earlier this month, Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona announced that the DOED would hold off from announcing any official changes until mid-May. 

This announcement marks the second month-long delay. 

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In a 2021 press release, the DOED stated that it would "enforce Title IX's prohibition on discrimination on the basis of sex to include: (1) discrimination based on sexual orientation; and (2) discrimination based on gender identity."

As Campus Reform reported last month, Republican Study Committee Chairman and U.S Representative Jim Banks (R- IN) is attempting to advance the Protection of Women and Girls in Sports Act to a vote on the House floor. 

The legislation aims to protect women's sports by invoking Title IX protections based on a "person's reproductive biology and genetics at birth."

Southeastern Legal Foundation Litigation Director Braden Boucek told Campus Reform in April that the proposal "rolls back 50 years of advancement for women's sports."

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Last week, the Republican Study Committee spearheaded the introduction of the "Women's Bill of Rights." 

The bill defines feminine terms that have been under siege- including "women," "girl," and "mother."

Campus Reform has also reported on eighteen states that have enacted laws to prevent men from competing on women's sports teams. The laws range from restricting participation at the K-12 or collegiate level.

Campus Reform has contacted the Department of Education for comment. This article will be updated accordingly.